Mortgages

First-time buyer lending sees September spike

Small deposit borrowers increased their market share from 22.8% to 24.2% in September, with overall approval levels also up compared to August, according to the latest data from e.surv.

Rozi Jones
|
12th October 2018
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"There has been a shift in the market towards young borrowers in September, it will be interesting to see whether this carries on into October "

Small deposit borrowers increased their market share from 22.8% to 24.2% in September, with overall approval levels also up compared to August, according to the latest data from e.surv.

Mid-market borrowers also saw an increase in market share, while every single part of the UK saw a smaller proportion of loans given to large deposit borrowers than a month ago.

Four regions - Northern Ireland, the North West, the Midlands and Yorkshire – saw a greater number of loans go to small deposit borrowers than their large deposit counterparts.

In Yorkshire, more than a third (33.5%) of loans were to first-time buyers and others with small deposits.

London once again was the market with the fewest small deposit buyers, with just 13.8% of all loans going to this part of the market during September.

Richard Sexton, director at e.surv, commented: “There has been a shift in the market towards young borrowers in September, it will be interesting to see whether this carries on into October and the rest of the year.

“Every single region reflected the national trend and saw a greater number of smaller deposit borrowers, while those with larger amounts of equity were squeezed.

“Those with small deposits in London and the South East still face a much harder time than those in the north and Northern Ireland. However, the slowdown in the capital will help more get onto the ladder in future months.

“Despite the rate rise, new mortgage borrowing is still very competitive and homeowners will continue to be tempted by cheap fixed rates. This will protect them against future base rate rises."

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